Welcome

This blog is for parents, teachers, tutors and students who want to support each other.

Advertisements

Welcome to our blog.

This blog is for parents, teachers, tutors and students who want to support each other.

Parents

Here you can find answers to questions as simple as what is e-learning. How will my child benefit from using e-learning? How can I support my child? Why is this e-learning platform better than any other one? Where can I find more information? How do Learning Port Modules align with the curriculum?

Teachers and Tutors

Blogs include the latest in technology, lesson plan ideas, musings about e-learning, and what is happening in the world of education.  You can find links to supplement your lessons. You can read about some of the many ways that you can use Learning Port products in and out of the classroom. Posts will also include articles about how to prepare students for higher education in the 21st-century.

Students

Look here for tips on how to prepare for exams or classroom tests. Find out which of our modules will help you understand lessons taught in your classroom. We may even throw in some games and jokes.

E-learning defined

An e-learner chooses when and where he or she will learn, and how long he or she will spend on the lesson. The e-learner takes learning into his or her own hands and follows the principles of motivation, feedback, practice, and reinforcement upon which e-learning is founded.

by Elizabeth Goodhue

E-learning

When I tell people that I work for an e-learning company, I am usually met with a blank stare, or comments like, oh, so you are a teacher? I am, but I don’t teach. I work with a team of teachers, instructional designers, graphic designers and programmers to design modules for both learners who want to learn outside of the classroom on their own time and at their own pace and for educators who want to use e-learning to motivate their students.

What is learning?

According to Google, learning is “the acquisition of knowledge or skills through experience, study, or by being taught.”

E-learning is “learning conducted via electronic media, typically on the Internet.

“Successful e-learning depends on the self-motivation of individuals to study effectively. ”

The key word here is learning. According to talentlms, learning is “acquiring skills to tackle not only today’s issues but to tackle tomorrow’s issues as well.” No matter how you define it, learning happens when we absorb information and retain it so that we can apply it to the world.

For the purpose of this article, which is to gain a general sense of the term, e-learning is learning from an Internet-based platform. An e-learner chooses when and where he or she will learn, and how long he or she will spend on the lesson. The e-learner takes learning into his or her own hands and follows the principles of motivation, feedback, practice, and reinforcement upon which e-learning is founded.

The bottom line

According to Michelle Cody, the bottom line is this: “The students need you, and they need you to refuse to leave, refuse to give up.”

Elizabeth Goodhue

Schools are ecosystems

“’Because schools aren’t broken, and we are not here to fix them, I don’t think we need to break them down and rebuild them,” she said. “Schools and districts are ecosystems, and ecosystems don’t break. But we do need to take care of them.

In the end, all the pieces are in place for education to work well. But these pieces need to be assembled in a different way if we want it to work better.’”

These are the words of Michelle Cody, an inspiring elementary teacher who gave a keynote speech at the 2016 ISTE conference. The International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE). ISTE’s mission supports teachers like Michelle to “continually improve learning and teaching around the world.”

Keep our educational ecosystem alive

As a teacher myself, I know how difficult it is to take the time to explore new ideas and venues in education. One of the reasons I left the classroom last year was so that I could gain some perspective on education in a global sense. Michelle Cody’s analogy to schools and ecosystems is a good one. It is easy to inhabit one tiny part of the ecosystem and think that the entire system is crashing down, but it isn’t. There are millions of us out there making sure that it stays alive.

Adapt and thrive

Ecosystems thrive when they adapt to the ever-changing environment. And even though we have accepted technology on a certain level, we need to absorb it completely. We need to embrace it in the classroom, at home, administratively, and as teachers. In order to do that, we need to synchronize. Every school needs to have adequate Internet access to function on a global level.  Once that is ensured, we can access all of the technology our students need to keep up with global education.

Share the wealth

Every system needs to be number one, not just Korea. It is all well and good to be the best, but when we get there, it is our responsibility to share the wealth. Why, as a global community, do we want anyone to be at the bottom of the list when it comes to education? If we want to be a global community, shouldn’t the best be lifting the worst to the top instead of reveling in all their glory?

Enough about idealism.

The reality is that you might be a teacher who works in an environment where students don’t have access to mobile devices, or your school may not have adequate bandwidth to support the kind of Internet that you find in the top ten school systems. So what do you do?

You learn. You take what you have and you work with it. You start to reassemble your ecosystem so that it works better. Eventually, the system will catch up with you if you model what technology does for your students.

Be hearty

We, teachers, are a hearty lot, and often we run out of the stamina to convince people of best teaching practice, but our students deserve to have the best. Once you teach them this, they will teach their parents, who will then push administrators and politicians to support the endeavor to excel in education.

The bottom line

According to Michelle Cody, the bottom line is this: “The students need you, and they need you to refuse to leave, refuse to give up.”

Attention Span and Technology

When students use Snapchat or Instagram during class, what are they trying to tell us?

 By Elizabeth Goodhue

When students use Snapchat or Instagram during class, what are they trying to tell us?

In 2015,  The Telegraph posted an article suggesting that humans have a shorter attention span than goldfish, thanks to smartphones. If this is true, then most of their readers did not read the conclusion: “Just because we may be allocating our attention differently as a function of the technologies we may be using, it doesn’t mean that the way our attention actually can function has changed.”

What is the average attention span?

Some research suggests that using a child’s age plus one year is a starting point for the number of minutes a child can attend to a single assigned task — 5 +1 minutes for a 5-year-old, 8 minutes for a 7-year-old, etc. This means that a teenager may be able to pay attention in class for 14 to 19 minutes. However, activity, interest, motivation, fatigue, among other things, factor into attention span.

What’s the real problem?

Perhaps instead of worrying about how technology distracts students, we should consider the real problem, which is how we teach our children. If a 15-year old’s attention span is 16 minutes, then why are we teaching in blocks of 50 to 90 minutes or more? If our attention spans are as short as the number of years we have lived, why shouldn’t our students use the Internet as a tool to get past the trivial stuff?

Learning efficiently

Using technology to promote learning, teaches self-motivation, pacing, and an efficient way to learn the essentials of math, science, reading and writing. Encouraging and training students to use technology to gain knowledge efficiently provides us with the space to teach them more about the world.

Open up the span of learning

By the time a student reaches university he or she should use calculators, e-learning, and other Internet sources. Then he or she will have more time to address the more important complex issues that no one else can solve, or write articles that no one else has written, or make new scientific discoveries.

Technology is no villain

The extra time students gain by using shortcuts that the Internet provides, gives them more time to explore things that it cannot teach us like compassion, empathy, grit, love, pain, dedication, motivation, how to navigate the world, and how to be happy.

Technology is not the villain when it comes to attention span. If we use technology in our classrooms to teach, we open space for critical thinking and problem solving. Then our students can move outside of the classroom to be interns, volunteer for people in need, perform scientific experiments, create masterpieces, or write symphonies.